GDPR For All


(Alex Jago) #1

Looks like some Yanks are running a campaign to make GDPR happen there too.

(Thanks to Asher Wolf for the link.)

Seems like a local version would be a good thing for us to get on board with.


(Peter Fulton) #2

The interesting thing, which has been pointed out as irony, about GDPR coming into effect is that in the last week, all of the sudden hundreds, if not thousands, of worldwide companies decided to flood everyone’s inboxes at the last minute with “We have updated our Privacy Policy”.

We should have our own version. I’m aware that we do already have some consumer law protection, it’s stupid where you have registration forms that inform you to check or uncheck an option to opt-out. It’s like a double-negative that does not equal a positive. I did the new privacy law familiarisation course for work, and it was explicit on this small thing that marketing comms and any data handling should be opt-in on consent, not opt-out. Companies know that people don’t want to spend time to read through their book-long policies, but this should not be licence to assume that people are completely OK with implied opt-in.


(Tim Challis) #3

I could not agree more (with both of you!)

I have received GDPR-inspired emails containing the interesting twist “despite the fact you have previously unsubscribed we reserve the right to send you this email…” (implying they neither care nor value anybody’s right to opt-out…or maybe they did not check at all?)

No thinking person buys the idea any more that marketers ever are on the consumer’s side, or even play fair, so policies (no matter how draconian) not in their interest get no sympathy from me!

Hope that is not too many negatives to parse?


(Alex Jago) #4

The fun thing about PPAU is that to be effective as a party, I think we actually need to be making more use of what member data we have. I say this because people tend to ignore emails, but if you call them they’ll actually show up to things.


(Peter Fulton) #5

Phone calls are more personable/personal and can deviate mid-call. Emails are passed off as marketing these days because it’s easy to simply mail-merge to give the that it’s personal because the message can be delivered in 1 go without interruption.


(Tim Challis) #6

Once more largely agree with both of you…BUT…telephone calls have been almost as tainted by telemarketer abuse as emails have been by spam abuse.

Frankly neither medium is trustworthy any more. I hope you can counter my natural cynicism because I don’t like the place this leaves me much either.


(Peter Fulton) #7

Yep, it’s shit that both mediums are tainted.

Another option is Social media, but not everyone is receptive to using it on a satisfactory basis to get all comms, or at all. There might be other media that can be used such as RSS feeds, but the existence of things like that are too obscure.

At this stage, you just gotta do whatever has potential to be most effective, then re-assess on results, ie. effective use of constructive feedback. I suppose that’s what SMO is all about?


#8

I’ve noticed a hilarious amount of propaganda about GDPR being somehow a bad thing. Adware companies aren’t gonna get any sympathy from me though.