The Party Name

(Lachlan Denham) #1

Hi everyone, I’m relatively new here so please give me a run down on anything I that implies that I might not know whats going on.

Speaking as someone who found the Pirate party platform a few months back doing some basic research on the parties running in 2019, I was very excited to find an extremely transparent, fact based platform that has both breadth and depth in various areas. Despite the brief explanation seen in the “How we began” section of you website I found myself slightly unconvinced that the name does a good job of portraying the platform that you have managed to develop. In addition the initial place my mind jumped to when I heard the name, was a micro party exclusively focused on anti ISP censorship (or even simply a joke party like ‘One Asian’).

Given that the large majority of Australian voters aren’t politically engaged enough to read a policy platform, or the origins of a party name I think the party would be greatly benefited by changing its name to something that holds some resemblance to the party platform, but also provides a positive impression at face value.

Personally I like the ‘Liberty Party’
Let me hear your thoughts on suggestions or reasons not to change. Thanks

1 Like
(Alex Jago) #2

Hi Lachlan -

Yes, this debate crops up periodically.

(Lachlan Denham) #3

Is there any chance to petition for some kind of party vote?

(Alex Jago) #4

It would be a constitutional amendment (among other things).

https://pirateparty.org.au/constitution/#part-iii-9.1

#5

As alluded by Alex, the topic has been discussed at length over the years and always draws no consensus and is considered to be a dead horse. There are rational arguments supporting for and against it needing to be done, but the consensus issue is agreeing on the name part itself. In those linked threads, there’s a good chance that “Liberty Party” along with derivatives have already been proposed.

3 Likes
(Alex Jago) #6

Quoting for emphasis.

Something I’d like to build (or have built, I’m not exactly trained for this) is a little semi-satirical page on the website taking new name suggestions and allowing voting on existing suggestions.

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(Lachlan Denham) #7

That sounds like an excellent way to give the conversation some clarity and meaning!

(Steven) #8

Even though the Pirate agenda is rather social-liberal in its traditional political way, Pirate party has its own economical agenda which emphasizes as rather both non-marxist and non-capitalist.
Liberal ideas are more concentrated on capitalism, whereas Pirate ideals concentrate on Digital Economy, Distributism/Georgist economical ideals, replacing the standard capital with virtual, rather.

Liberals tend to provide too much power to digital intellectual property, whereas Pirate ideology tends to reduce its power and/or eliminate it. Some Pirate radicals even support elimination of Copyright itself (marxist way), while maintaining real life private property (liberal way).
Some Pirates support nationalization of petroleum reserves in order to protect nature ( socialism ), and in the same time zero-taxes for green energy companies ( liberal )

Traditional politics like socialism and liberalism tend to maintain the same political position in all contexts:
-> Liberals want everything to be private. Full capitalistic.
-> Socialist-Communists want everything to be public & nationalized. Full socialistic.

The term Pirate is exactly what represents supporting a direct/liquid/participative democracy ( completely opposite to Emanuel Kant’s vision of democracy ), digital economy, digital free culture, etc.
It began with the liberation of slaves and giving black people and women the power and rights they never had. That’s how equality began. And the Pirate social roots are there, from the Free Republic of Nassau, a self-governed short-lived land with participative universal suffrage democracy.

Pirate ideology encompasses the Virtual, as a independent anarchic & free space, a second reality that helps our stable reality thrive, through Free Culture. That’s why the term Pirate, it is used to protect and maintain virtual reality as it is.
Liberalism / Socialism philosophies never actually encompassed or thought of something like virtual reality. The philosophers couldn’t include such a thing in their political philosophies, because it didn’t exist back then.
Nowadays each philosophy tries to adapt itself to virtual reality, and failing horribly, creating monsters like ACTA, European Copyright Directive, and so forth.

In Europe, both liberals and socialists, and conservatives, communists and almost all of the european politics spectrum, supported Copyright Directive. Pirates did not. This is the ideology and term, we protect the free Internet, which is rather in our ideology, and our future.

Also, one more note:
-> Liberalism proposes the irregular expansion of property and business, without proper power balance. Pirates are on the other side of the story: support expansion, but decentralize power. Hence, why the pirate term is not coined as also-Liberal.

4 Likes
#9

The best approach I believe is not to focus on the need to update the Party Name but instead focus on clarifying the concept and meaning of a ‘Pirate’ in relation to Cyberspace and the Digital Economy.

Are we socialists? No.
Are we communists? No.
Are we capitalists? No.
Are we fascists? No.
Are we anarchists? No.

What are we? We’re Pirates.

And the great thing about us is our designation doesn’t end with an ‘ism’ (imagine Piratism, no thank you).

Our existence should be INDEPENDENT of past and current idealogies. Instead, our existence should be tied EXCLUSIVELY to the Internet, Information Access and the intersection between the Real and Virtual world for the betterment of the individual, collective, society and the State (within Freedom-respecting bounds).

Anything else should be seen as an additional layer above the foundation mentioned above.

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(Lachlan Denham) #10

I don’t disagree with the fact that the ‘liberty party’ or most any traditional party name for that matter, will be to some extent a misrepresentation of the party platform. That being said, I think that those politically engaged enough to seek out the party platform in the first place are likely to judge the party on its policies and discussion, rather than the name. Those who aren’t politically engaged enough to care will look at the name, and respond based on if they like it on an emotional level. While the former is the base of voters the pirate party is already doing a good job of appealing to (because they are judging based on policy) the latter is sadly, the large majority of voters. Changing the name to better appeal to them is a good decision if the culture of positive and in-depth discourse that has been developed here, is going to be implemented in any meaningful way in parliament.

That’s also why I like ‘The Liberty Party’ as a name, because both the left and the right of the political spectrum hold the concept of liberty in high regard, and the average voter would not be engaged enough to connect it to the underlying political theory of libertarian-ism.

(Steven) #11

Pirate means Liberty. I believe the name shouldn’t be changed based on the fact that ideology can easily vary for a “Liberty” named party. Check the Liberty parties in Europe - Almost all of them are declared as far-right anti-immigrationist, something like liberty for us, nothing for the rest, completely opposite to Pirate which means liberty for everyone ( derived from the old Pirate Republic of Nassau, again )

A second problem would mean that you invite a lot of liberals, and they would tend to provide special liberties to the most productive members of the society - the corporations, biggest money come from them. Socialists would see this liberty party as a good reason to offer liberty to the many against the few, and start ripping off the productive members of the society - all businesses, no matter if small or big - which is against Pirate liberties that emphasize on balancing based on power and centralization of power.

We would invite a lot of wrong people with too many different ideologies, effectively corrupting the Pirate ideals.
Pirate ideals are standing strong in Czech Republic, right now, and winning a lot of votes!

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(miles_w) #12

Unfortunately, liberty has been coopted by right wingers who often twist it to support conservative positions. I think we all support liberty, but many Pirates struggle to call themselves libertarians due to stigma held by left wingers from right wingers misusing the term.

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(Mark) #13

The best party names leap from the ballot paper and drill the core idea directly into the voter’s mind. Liberty Party is fine, but it lacks the absolute clarity of a name like, say, Animal Justice Party. Words like “liberty”, “freedom”, “commons” etc risk blending into the ballot paper and being hard to interpret.

The problem we have is that our concepts don’t lend themselves to being communicated in one or two words. Whatever the flaws with Pirate, it is at least eye-catching, and quite widely known as part of a global brand.

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(John) #14

The only name I would consider changing to would be the Centrist Party because that is what is missing in our political atmosphere in Australia. “you’re either for them of agin them”!

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(loz59er@bigpond.com) #15

G’day to ALL.
I am a newly signed up pending acceptance member and I would like to add my two cents worth please. To my mind, and my perception of the “Australian mentality” as it stands at present, (always changes which is a natural state of affairs), Liberty Party smacks too much of “Americanism”. I would like a more Australian universal for all name like “Australian Common Wealth Party” As it is a play on words, is easy to remember, it says what we stand for, (common wealth being Australian resources for All Australian citizens) this also may negate any legal reasons for not being able to use the word “Commonwealth”, as I understood one can’t use the word Commonwealth in a party’s name. Thank you.
Laurrie.

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(Steven) #16

Pirate” is a global brand, as stated above. It has its own ideology.
If you don’t like it, you don’t necessarily need to be part of it.